T. G. Green’s Pottery, Derbyshire

T. G. Green’s produced the Cornishware range of kitchenware at their Pottery in Derbyshire. The striped design is still produced today but the original factory closed in 2007.

TG Greens Pottery Works, Derbyshire
 

History of T.G. Green’s Pottery

T. G. Green’s was a pottery in Derbyshire, established in 1864 by Thomas Goodwin Green. He bought an existing pottery in Church Gresley near Swadlingcote after making a fortune in Australia.

T. G. Green’s produced a line known as Cornishware, a striped kitchenware brand. The line was introduced in 1924 as a way to keep the pottery busy during difficult years, and it proved to be a huge success for the next 30 years. The products were sold through high-street stores such as Woolworths, high end retails such as Harrods and were exported throughout the world.

The jars and pots in the Cornishware range would be produced with standard words such as Flour, Tea, Coffee, Sugar, Salt, etc. but stores selling the products could send a slip in to TG Green’s detailing any wording a customer requested. The pottery would then produce the pots and ship them back to the store for customer collection.

The signature colour of E. Blue (meaning Electric Blue) was the only colour available until 1959 when Sunlit Yellow was also introduced. New designers were brought in from the Royal Collage of Art during the 1960’s, most notable Judith Onions who introduced distinctive new shapes that are still in use today.

The company ceased production in 2007 when the factory was closed under the ownership of parent company The Tabletop Group. The range was revived in 2009 when T. G. Greens was bought by a trio of British investors.

Our Visit
I’d wanted to visit the nostalgic T. G. Greens for a while, but just never got round to it, so while in the area with Spider Monkey we popped in for a look around. All the remaining items make it feel like you’re stepping back in time, although the place is really starting to suffer the test of time now.

 

T. G. Greens Pottery - Nature reclaiming the factory

T. G. Greens Pottery – Nature reclaiming the factory

T. G. Greens Pottery - Motivational staircase

T. G. Greens Pottery – Motivational staircase

T. G. Greens Pottery - More indoor greenery

T. G. Greens Pottery – More indoor greenery

T. G. Greens Pottery - Word areas

T. G. Greens Pottery – Word areas

T. G. Greens Pottery - Scales and papers

T. G. Greens Pottery – Scales and papers

T. G. Greens Pottery - Leftover equipment

T. G. Greens Pottery – Leftover equipment

T. G. Greens Pottery - One of the large kilns

T. G. Greens Pottery – One of the large kilns

T. G. Greens Pottery - Tables and chairs in the staff canteen

T. G. Greens Pottery – Tables and chairs in the staff canteen

T. G. Greens Pottery - Staff canteen

T. G. Greens Pottery – Staff canteen

T. G. Greens Pottery - Cross on medical room door

T. G. Greens Pottery – Cross on medical room door

T. G. Greens Pottery - Examination bed and curtain in the Medical room

T. G. Greens Pottery – Examination bed and curtain in the Medical room

T. G. Greens Pottery - Paintbrush and paint

T. G. Greens Pottery – Paintbrush and paint

T. G. Greens Pottery - Bottles and card

T. G. Greens Pottery – Bottles and card

T. G. Greens Pottery - Store room

T. G. Greens Pottery – Store room

T. G. Greens Pottery - Shelves stacked with unpainted pots

T. G. Greens Pottery – Shelves stacked with unpainted pots

T. G. Greens Pottery - Store room stacked high with pots and bowls

T. G. Greens Pottery – Store room stacked high with pots and bowls

T. G. Greens Pottery - External with company name on roof

T. G. Greens Pottery – External with company name on roof





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